Select Page

New WONDER WOMAN Concept Art Shows Princess Diana Becoming A Hero

New WONDER WOMAN Concept Art Shows Princess Diana Becoming A Hero

As part of their upcoming summer movie preview, EW released new Wonder Woman concept art, which features Princess Diana (Gal Gadot), discovering her true power before she can truly become Wonder Woman as she enters the grim no-man’s-land between English and German battlefield trenches.

Gadot told EW:

“It’s a very powerful moment. We have a character committing to her true self, doing what she believes needs to be done.”

EW added:

“It’s this battlefield scene that marks the first time Diana reveals her iconic garb — a moment that Jenkins (Monster) equates to Superman ripping apart his dress shirt to unveil the S across his chest: “It’s when she says, ‘Enough is enough.’”

Wonder Woman concept art

The film also co-stars Chris Pine, Connie Nielsen, Robin Wright, David Thewlis, Danny Huston, Elena Anaya, Ewen Bremner, and Saïd Taghmaoui.

Before she was Wonder Woman, she was Diana, princess of the Amazons, trained to be an unconquerable warrior. Raised on a sheltered island paradise, when an American pilot crashes on their shores and tells of a massive conflict raging in the outside world, Diana leaves her home, convinced she can stop the threat. Fighting alongside man in a war to end all wars, Diana will discover her full powers…and her true destiny.

Screenplay for Wonder Woman was written by by Allan Heinberg and Geoff Johns, story by Zack Snyder & Allan Heinberg, based on characters from DC Entertainment.

Wonder Woman will hit theaters on June 2nd.

Let us know what you think of the Wonder Woman concept art on the comments below.

 

PLEASE FEEL FREE TO SHARE THIS POST ON YOUR FACEBOOK WALL AND WITH YOUR TWITTER FOLLOWERS! JUST HIT THE BUTTONS ON THE BOTTOM OF THIS PAGE.

About The Author

Austin Chavez

Austin Chavez is a student at St. John's University in Queens, NY.

Instagram Feed

1
Something is wrong. Response takes too long or there is JS error. Press Ctrl+Shift+J or Cmd+Shift+J on a Mac.